Exploring Canada Corner

Exploring Canada Corner Written by Pam Preedy. “If I should die, think only this of me That there’s some corner of a foreign field That is Forever England Rupert Brooke “The Soldier”, 1914 If you take a walk up Church Street to All Saints Church and its graveyard, you’ll find Canada Corner which adjoins the church and is also on the opposite side of the road. In 1912, the old graveyard was becoming too small and an extension was needed. A field, the last field suitable for such a purpose,…

Standard H-2

STANDARD H2/H3 SERIES inc H-4-H variant The Standard H-2 was an early American Army reconnaissance aircraft, first ordered in 1916 and designed by the Standard Aircraft Corporation. It derived from the Sloane H-2, an open-cockpit, three-seater tractor biplane. It was propelled by a 125 hp (90 kW) Hall-Scott A-5 engine. However only three prototypes were built for tests. This led to the next iteration of the H series, the improved H-3, which kept the engine. After succesful tests, this model gained an order of nine planes. The US Navy was…

Airco DH.4 Liberty

Airco DH.4 Liberty The Airco DH.4 was a British two-seat biplane day bomber of the First World War. It was designed by Geoffrey de Havilland (hence “DH”) for Airco, and was the first British two-seat light day-bomber to have an effective defensive armament. The DH.4 was developed as a light two-seat combat aircraft, intended to perform both aerial reconnaissance and day bomber missions. One of the early aims of the design was for it to be powered by the newly-developed Beardmore Halford Pullinger (BHP) engine, capable of generating up to…

PACKARD Le Pere LUSAC 11

PACKARD Le Pere LUSAC 11 PACKARD Le Pere LUSAC 11 The LUSAC-11 (Lepère United States Army Combat) was an early American two-seat fighter aircraft. It was a French design, commissioned and built in the United States during World War I and ordered in large numbers by the United States Army Air Corps, but these were cancelled at the end of the war, and only 30 were built. The LUSAC-11 was the perfect example of a fast and powerful “jack of all trades”, able to perform fighting missions as well as…

Burgess HT-2 Speed Scout

BURGESS HT-B; HT-2 SPEED SCOUT The Burgess HT-2 Speed Scout was an experimental United States observation/fighter seaplane. The Speed Scout’s airframe was made of wood with a fabric covering, except for the engine cowling which was aluminum; the aircraft was powered by a Curtiss OXX-2 engine. Despite being underpowered, 8 were purchased by the US Navy in 1917 following demonstration flights on 19 May 1917. In the late autumn of 1916, the US Navy framed a requirement which, issued on 17 November, called for a float-equipped single-seat fighting scout with…

Curtiss JN-4

Curtiss JN-4 The Curtiss JN-4 “Jenny” was one of a series of “JN” biplanes built by the Curtiss Aeroplane Company of Hammondsport, New York, later the Curtiss Aeroplane and Motor Company. Although the Curtiss JN series was originally produced as a training aircraft for the U.S. Army, the “Jenny” (the common nickname derived from “JN-4”, with an open-topped four appearing as a Y) continued after World War I as a civil aircraft, as it became the “backbone of American postwar [civil] aviation.” Thousands of surplus Jennys were sold at bargain…

BOEING MODEL 4 (EA)

BOEING MODEL 4 (EA) – Trainer Plane US Based The Boeing Model 2, and its derivatives were United States two-place training seaplanes, the first “all-Boeing” design and the company’s first financial success. The Boeing Airplane Company, built the Model C naval trainer as its first mass-produced airplane. A total of 56 C-type trainers were built; 55 used twin pontoons. The Model C-1F had a single main pontoon and small auxiliary floats under each wing and was powered by a Curtiss OX-5 engine. The success of the Model C led to…

Lebed XV11

Lebed XV11 The Lebed XV11 was the most advanced of all ‘ Lebed’ family. Its Salmson140 or 150hp engine was well cowled and equipped with large spinner. Exhaust stacks send gases down the main landing gear struts. Same struts carried two radiators. Forward section of the fuselage was rounded to accommodate the engine and covered with plywood. Tail section was of strut-brace structure, covered with fabric. It was a single-bay, two-seat reconnaissance biplane. The upper wing had a center-wing section; two tubular radiators were attached to shaped front struts; the…

Ledbed X11

Lebed X11 The Lebed XII was a Russian military reconnaissance aircraft produced during the First World War for the Imperial Russian Air Force. It was one of the few domestically designed aircraft to see production in Russia during the war, but was based on designs and techniques learned from Lebed’s rebuilding of captured German types. The fuselage was a plywood structure of rectangular cross-section with seating for the pilot and observer in tandem, open cockpits. The wings were built around a pine spar and covered in fabric, and the empennage…

NEIUPORT 4

Neiuport IV The Nieuport IV was a French-built sporting, training and reconnaissance monoplane of the early 1910s. The first Nieuport IVs were built in 1911 and production continued well into World War I in Russia. The design was adopted in small numbers by most air arms of the period, although the Imperial Russian Air Service was the largest user. The IV.G was one of the principal aircraft used by the Imperial Russian Air Service during its formative years, with roughly 300 being produced locally by the Russo-Baltic Wagon Works and…