Who was Sir Tiffy Cate?

In 1941 a strange figure (or figures) were roaming around towns and cities across the country under the guise of “Sir Tiffy Cate”, but who was this mystery man? In fact the answer is not sinister in the least, though perhaps less likely to happen in these modern days, but it was a sort of games set up as part of the country’s War Weapon weeks, where towns and districts raise vital funds for the war effort through National saving Certificates and Stamps. One such event organised was for a…

Saving for the War Campaign

The National Savings Movement was a mass savings movement that operated in Britain between 1916 and 1978. It was used to finance the deficit of government spending over tax revenues. The movement provided an easy and safe way for ordinary people to save small sums of money, and was particularly active during wartime, when government spending was at its highest. During World War II it was instrumental in raising funds to support the war effort – a War Savings Campaign was set up by the War Office to support the war…

Making Ends Meet

This advert appeared in the Bromley & District Times on 9th August 1940 Think of Great Britain as one great factory.  Working at full pressure its output of goods can be vastly increased.  But from this entire output must come both the seeds of the fighting services and the requirements of the rest of us.  The Services must come first. The war must be won and in the shortest possible time.  This means – and we must face the hard fact – that you and I must go without many…